Endocrinology & Diabetology

WHO WE ARE

As the one stop point for all diabetes and related diseases, the NIMS Centre of Endocrinology and Research is changing the face of endocrinology in Kerala. Started on May 21st, 2014 this is the first of its kind endeavour to be launched in Kerala, where all the endocrinology needs are available under the same roof.

NICER not only deals with diabetes. It also specialises in diseases and conditions that can affect the other parts of the human body like kidney, liver, nervous system, heart, eyes, etc. Not only does it treat these diseases but also provide treatments that can be labelled as world class in all aspects. Other the treatment of the diseases and conditions in relation to diabetes, NICER also focuses on conducting research on the different nuances concerning the department of endocrinology and how better the treatment procedures can be effectuated.

DID YOU KNOW ?

Diabetes is by far the most fearful and fast spreading disease in India. As per the statistics released by the World Health Organisation, there will be around 10 crore diabetic patients in India. The birth of NICER in such an alarming situation can be seen as a positive effort to tackle this menace that is fast gripping the world. The patients affected by diabetes are in need of varied types of treatments. When some can be treated with food control and exercises, others need to be treated for various serious levels of diabetes.

OUR VISION

To ensure that all the diabetic patients in and around Kerala gets world class treatment and facilities and in due course of time bring the menace of diabetes under control.

OUR MISSION

To serve the diabetic patients and help them bring the deadly disease of diabetes under control effectively and efficiently.

OUR LEADERSHIP

NICER works under the effective leadership of Dr. V. Sasi Kumar, renowned endocrinologist. Dr. V. Sasi Kumar has more than 25 years of experience in this field and has worked in association with many international and national organisations in his efforts to tackle the menace of diabetes. A true philanthropist, as the director of NICER it is an uphill task that he has undertaken and confidently believes that he will make it possible. Under the able guidance of him, there is a team of expert doctors working at NICER making diabetic cure and care possible for all the people of Kerala without difference of wealth or class.

NICER GUIDELINES FOR DIABETES

Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It’s not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat.

Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it’s crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions of the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count.

Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. It’s especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and the appropriate balance of food types. Coordinate your meals and medications. Too little food in proportion to your diabetes medications especially insulin may result in dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Too much food may cause your blood sugar level to climb too high (hyperglycemia). Talk to your diabetes health care team about how to best coordinate meal and medication schedules. Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages. Sugar-sweetened beverages including those sweetened with high fructose corn syrup or sucrose tend to be high in calories and offer little in the way of nutrition. And because they cause blood sugar to rise quickly, it’s best to avoid these types of drinks if you have diabetes. The exception is if you are experiencing a low blood sugar level. Sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, juice and sports drinks, can be used as an effective treatment for quickly raising blood sugar that is too low.

Physical activity is another important part of your diabetes management plan. When you exercise, your muscles use sugar (glucose) for energy. Regular physical activity also helps your body use insulin more efficiently. These factors work together to lower your blood sugar level. The more strenuous your workout, the longer the effect lasts. But even light activities such as housework, gardening or being on your feet for extended periods can improve your blood sugar level. Talk to your doctor about an exercise plan. Ask your doctor about what type of exercise is appropriate for you. In general, most adults should exercise at least 30 minutes a day on most days of the week. If you’ve been inactive for a long time, your doctor may want to check your overall health before advising you. He or she can recommend the right balance of aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise.Keep an exercise schedule. Talk to your doctor about the best time of day for you to exercise so that your workout routine is coordinated with your meal and medication schedules.

DO’S AND DON’TS

Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages. Sugar-sweetened beverages including those sweetened with high fructose corn syrup or sucrose tend to be high in calories and offer little in the way of nutrition. And because they cause blood sugar to rise quickly, it’s best to avoid these types of drinks if you have diabetes. The exception is if you are experiencing a low blood sugar level. Sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, juice and sports drinks, can be used as an effective treatment for quickly raising blood sugar that is too low. Physical activity is another important part of your diabetes management plan. When you exercise, your muscles use sugar (glucose) for energy. Regular physical activity also helps your body use insulin more efficiently. These factors work together to lower your blood sugar level. The more strenuous your workout, the longer the effect lasts. But even light activities such as housework, gardening or being on your feet for extended periods can improve your blood sugar level.

Talk to your doctor about an exercise plan. Ask your doctor about what type of exercise is appropriate for you. In general, most adults should exercise at least 30 minutes a day on most days of the week. If you’ve been inactive for a long time, your doctor may want to check your overall health before advising you. He or she can recommend the right balance of aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise.

Keep an exercise schedule. Talk to your doctor about the best time of day for you to exercise so that your workout routine is coordinated with your meal and medication schedules.

Know your numbers. Talk to your doctor about what blood sugar levels are appropriate for you before you begin exercise.

Check your blood sugar level. Check your blood sugar level before, during and after exercise, especially if you take insulin or medications that lower blood sugar. Exercise can lower your blood sugar levels even a day later, especially if the activity is new to you, or if you’re exercising at a more intensive level. Be aware of warning signs of low blood sugar, such as feeling shaky, weak, tired, hungry, lightheaded, irritable, anxious or confused.

If you use insulin and your blood sugar level is below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 5.6 millimoles per Litre (mmol/L), have a small snack before you start exercising to prevent a low blood sugar level.

Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water or other fluids while exercising because dehydration can affect blood sugar levels.

Be prepared. Always have a small snack or glucose tablet with you during exercise in case your blood sugar drops too low. Wear a medical identification bracelet when you’re exercising.

Adjust your diabetes treatment plan as needed. If you take insulin, you may need to reduce your insulin dose before exercising or wait awhile after exercise to inject insulin. Your doctor can advise you on appropriate changes in your medication. You may also need to adjust treatment if you’ve increased your exercise routine.

OUR FACILITIES AND SERVICES

  • All treatment process and medical facilities under the same roof.
  • Well-equipped modern ICU, Laboratories and Operation Theatres.
  • A branch of NIMS medicity.
  • Adherence to international standards and guidelines.
  • Dietician on call.
  • Yoga classes and meditation.
  • Weight control and reduction treatments.
  • Telephonic treatment for needy patients.